What is a Home Inspection?

       A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation. The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s heating system; central air conditioning system (temperature permitting); interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation and structural components. 


We follow the InterNACHI Standards of Practice.

What we look at in a home inspection:

  • roof, vents, flashings and trim
  • gutters and downspouts
  • skylight, chimney, and other roof penetrations
  • decks, stoops, porches, walkways and railings
  • eaves, soffits and fascia
  • grading and drainage
  • basement, foundation and crawlspace
  • water penetration and foundation movement
  • heating system
  • cooling system
  • main water shut-off valve
  • water heating system
  • interior plumbing fixtures and faucets
  • drainage sump pumps with accessible floats
  • electrical service line and meter box
  • main disconnect and service amperage
  • electrical panel(s), breakers and fuses
  • grounding and bonding
  • GFCIs and AFCIs
  • fireplace damper door and hearth
  • insulation and ventilation
  • garage doors, safety sensors and openers
  • and much more

4-Point Inspections

badge-4pointInsurance companies have become increasingly reluctant to issue Homeowner Insurance Policies on older homes (usually 25 years old or more).

Their common concern is that there may be conditions in an older home that could become a liability to them. For instance; a home with a roof nearing the end of its reliable service life may fail while under the policy and the homeowner may seek reimbursement from their insurance company for damages to the home or its contents. Similar concerns extend to the condition of the HVAC, electrical and plumbing systems in an older home. If these elements are in poor condition, in need of being updated or replaced or were improperly installed, they may fail and cause fire  or water damage to a home.  A “Four Point Inspection” focuses only on four main areas of interest in a home:

  1. HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning)
  2. Electrical wiring, panels and grounding
  3. Plumbing connections and fixtures
  4. Roof

Wind Mitigations

badge-windmitThe inspection and report describes the condition and age of these elements.

Insurance companies want these forms filled out by qualified individuals such as a licensed Professional Engineer, Architects or Certified Building Contractors.

A Wind Mitigation Inspection verifies the construction details of your home and is used to qualify for discounts on your insurance premium. The better your house is built to withstand Wind Damage, the more discounts you will qualify for each year.

A wind mitigation inspection is a type of home inspection. The purpose of a wind mitigation inspection is to determine the appropriateness of a given structure’s construction in the event of strong winds, such as those present in a hurricane.

Windstorm inspections look for construction features that have been shown to reduce losses in hurricanes, such as a hip roof, type of construction, the presence of gable end bracing, shutters and opening protections, the presence of roof to wall attachments such as toe nails, clips or hurricane straps, and the presence of a secondary water resistance barrier.

A homeowner with windstorm insurance can often submit the results of a windstorm inspection to their insurer to obtain discounts on their windstorm insurance. In Florida premium discounts for certain favorable wind mitigation features are mandated by State law and can total 45% of the original policy’s premium.




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